Chinese Stocks Fell Sharply as The Government Reduced Demand Stimulus

China’s stock market on April 25 saw the biggest drop in the past 6 weeks due to the growing concern of investors about the government’s ability to cut economic stimulus measures.

According to Bloomberg, the Shanghai Composite Index closed with a fall of 2.4%, bringing the total decrease from the beginning of the week to 4.5%. With such a decline, this week could become the strongest week of the index since the beginning of the year.

Stocks of telecommunications, technology, and consumer goods were not essential to lead the fall of the whole market. For every 10 stocks that have declined, there will be 1 gainer. Along with that, the exchange rate of the RMB against the US dollar dropped to the lowest level since the beginning of the month.

The mood of Chinese securities investors worsened from last week. After a meeting of the Politburo, the market raised rumors that the Government will cut measures to support the economy.

Earlier, growth stimulus measures have become the factor that led Chinese stocks to increase the world’s strongest since the beginning of the year. In the past year, Chinese stocks plunged due to the slowing economy and the US-China trade war.

In recent days, there are many forecasts that the US and China are about to come to a trade agreement. However, this assessment is not enough to lift the psychology of Chinese securities investors.

Strategist Zhang Gang of Central China Securities said that concerns about the possibility of policy shift are negatively affecting the market. Investors can hardly find any industry stocks that help them earn money at this time, so they feel an urgent need to leave the market.

The decline of Chinese stocks took place despite PBoC claims there was no change in monetary policy stance and no intention of tightening or easing policies. Northeast Securities strategist Zhengyang Shen commented that it seems that investors are rushing to sell stocks to take profits, taking into account changes in expectations of government stimulus measures.